Who Is The Father Of Drifting? – Celebrity

Kunimitsu Takahashi is the “father of drifting.” He experimented with intentionally oversteering his car to slide through a corner. Advertisement Takahashi was considered the “father of drifting” as early as the 1970s.

TopSpeed summarizes its origins with Kunimitsu Takahashi, a former professional motorcycle and road racer thought to be the technique’s creator. Dubbed the “father of drifting,” he experimented with intentionally oversteering his car to slide through a corner.

So to conclude Kunimitsu Takahashi is the father of drifting he started drifting his car before Tsuchiya, Keiichi made drifting a real thing he mastered the art of going sideways and he is therefore called the drift king. How Tsuchiya Keiichi became “The Drift King” Watch on

Drifting originated in Japanese automobile racing. It was most popular in the All Japan Touring Car Championship races. Famous motorcyclist turned driver Kunimitsu Takahashi was the foremost creator of drifting techniques in the 1970s.

Unbeknownst to him, Kunimitsu Takahashi had invented drifting. Compared to his wins these brief displays probably seemed trivial at the time, but the theatrics captured the attention of countless fans, among them a young Keiichi Tsuchiya.

Japanese Beginnings As a sport, drifting takes its roots from Japan with one particular racer being credited for making the technique popular among the Japanese. His name is Kunimitsu Takahashi, a renowned Japanese motorcyclist that also became popular for his drifting techniques.

Who was the inventor?

An American movie franchise about muscle cars isn’t where the art of drifting came from. The actual origins of the technique come from Japan in the 1970s. TopSpeed summarizes its origins with Kunimitsu Takahashi, a former professional motorcycle and road racer thought to be the technique’s creator.

If you’ve only seen drifting in movies, you’re missing out. The science behind it is simple but brilliant, and it’s no wonder that it’s become so popular among competitive racers.

Who invented the drift?

If one man can be credited with inventing the drift it’s Kunimitsu Takahashi. And he started on two wheels, not four. Shocker! Takahashi was a pro-racer of legendary status. Riding for Honda, he was the first Japanese motorcycle racer to win a Grand Prix in 1961, with three more wins over the next few years.

1970s and ‘80s: The Drift King. Takahashi may have created the drift, but Keiichi Tsuchiya took it to another level. Illegally tearing down the winding mountain roads of Japan in the dead of night from point A to point B, Tsuchiya and his trusty 1986 Toyota Sprinter were setting records of a less official kind.

Drift King: The History Of Drifting. Drifting, according to Wikipedia, is defined as: “A driving technique where the driver intentionally oversteers, with loss of traction in the rear wheels or tires, while maintaining control and driving the car through the entirety of a corner.”.

This is where the ‘Dorikin’ aka ‘Drift King’ was born. Tsuchiya leveled up from the streets to the track quickly. He officially emerged in the 1977 Fuji Freshman race before moving up to the All Japan Touring Car Championship.

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His official credibility and street cred made him a hero to many on both sides. By 1989 Tsuchiya himself co-created Video Option Ikaten, the first officially sanctioned drifting event (although Carboy had them beat with the first event in 1986).

Where did drifting originate?

Origin. Japan was the birthplace of drifting. It was most popular in the All Japan Touring Car Championship races. Famous motorcyclist turned driver Kunimitsu Takahashi was the foremost creator of drifting techniques in the 1970s.

Keiichi Tsuchiya, known as the “Drift King” (ドリフトキング, Dorifuto Kingu), became particularly interested by Takahashi’s drift techniques. Tsuchiya began practicing his drifting skills on the mountain roads of Japan, and quickly gained a reputation amongst the racing crowd.

Drift cars are usually light- to moderate-weight rear-wheel-drive coupes and sedans, offering a large range of power levels. There have also been all-wheel drive cars that have been converted to rear-wheel drive such as the Subaru WRX, Toyota Avensis, Scion tC, Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution, Dodge Charger, and Nissan GT-R. Early on, AWD cars without conversion were allowed in some drifting competitions, and usually the rules allowed only a certain percentage of power to be sent to the front wheels, but they are banned in most (if not all) drifting competitions today.

Drifting is a driving technique where the driver intentionally oversteers, with loss of traction, while maintaining control and driving the car through the entirety of a corner. The technique causes the rear slip angle to exceed the front slip angle to such an extent that often the front wheels are pointing in the opposite direction to the turn …

Drifting (motorsport) Drifting is a driving technique where the driver intentionally oversteers, with loss of traction, while maintaining control and driving the car through the entirety of a corner. The technique causes the rear slip angle to exceed the front slip angle to such an extent that often the front wheels are pointing in …

The preferred form of LSD for drifting is the clutch type, in “two-way” form, for its consistent and aggressive lockup behavior under both acceleration and deceleration. Some drift cars use a spool “differential”, which actually has no differential action at all — the wheels are locked to each other.

While Ackermann geometry is helpful in making a car turn easier, it inhibits the ability to slide sideways at full lock necessary to compete in drifting.

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